old house
Unsplash | Markus Spiske

84-Year-Old Forces Mall To Build Around Her House Instead Of Cashing In A Million Dollars

There are many times in our lives when we feel the need to stand up for ourselves and stand our ground for things we love and believe in. While we may not know it at that moment, we could be inspiring dozens or hundreds of people all over by sticking to our guns and standing our ground. It could be a small thing, or a big thing, but by standing up for what we know is right, we can build an entire movement.

Edith Macefield is an example of someone who knows how to stand her ground.

army
Unsplash | Stijn Swinnen

Macefield has been quite a rebel all of her life. In her past, she told her mother she was "going to college" at the age of 16 but secretly joined the army, instead. She was later thrown out of the army once they learned she was underage, and she moved to Ballard, Seattle.

She moved into a quaint home that she loved and cherished.

old house
Unsplash | Peter Herrmann

Moving into a home that you love and cherish as your own is something special, especially when you own it. When someone tries to take it away from you, you're going to put up a fight—for sure.

That's exactly what happened to Macefield.

Dozens of times, Macefield was approached to sell her home as the land was prime for development and real estate. She refused time and time again. In 2007, she was approached yet again and refused. So, the real estate developers decided to go down a new path.

They built around Macefield's home, instead of knocking it down.

Macefield was able to keep her house, and the developers bought the entire street—with the exception of her sole home. They decided they would build around it, if they couldn't build through it.

After Macefield died, she left the home to construction superintendent Barry Martin.

Macefield and Martin befriended each other after years of Macefield living there. When she died, she left the house to Martin, because he had been so kind to her over the years. But, in 2009, he sold the property. It ended up in foreclosure and no one wanted to buy it.

With no bids or purchases, the house was set to be demolished.

People in the Seattle area did not want the house to be destroyed or demolished, and many of them were protesting its destruction. The house became such a well-known staple, that people started to model it after the house in Up.

While the movie "Up" wasn't directly based on the house, many connected the two stories.

Up
Giphy | Disney

Up a 2009 Disney Pixar movie, focused on an older man who refused to sell the home he had purchased with his late wife. Despite numerous contractors trying to get the man to sell, he stood his ground. Eventually, the balloon salesman decided to tie thousands of balloons to the home, lifting it off the ground and allowing him to keep it.

Due to the movie connection, people in Seattle began to tie balloons to the home.

Stopping by Macefield's home, many began to tie balloons to it—to both promote the film and also honor Macefield's drive and determination to keep her home. Many hoped it would turn developers away from trying to destroy the home.

People now come from all over to see the home.

“There are always people rolling by here. They’re very emotionally attached to it. I think it speaks volumes about how fast the city is changing and how people love to hold on to a little bit of magic," said Steven Raymond via Fox 13 Seattle.

In 2018, the developers announced that they would keep the house standing.

Instead of knocking the house down, the developers listened to the late Macefield and the public and decided to keep the home standing as part of their development.

"Honestly, I think we’re a lot alike. I’m stubborn and so was she. We’ve had some incredible arguments. She was amazingly smart. I think this illustrate’s Edith’s character," a developer noted.

If you're ever in the Seattle area, stop by and visit the monumental home.

The house still stands, with more balloons being tied to it on a regular basis. Many stop by to see the history behind it or even snap a quick photo. So, if you're ever in the Seattle area, stop by and grab a photo with the Macefield home!