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Video Captures The Moment Wakeboarding Woman Discovers The Sea Is Fuller Than It Looks

When we're already having a lot of fun, it's hard to imagine how we could be having a better time. After all, we've finally found a moment where we're actually living in the moment, so it's usually hard to see anything that grabs our attention as anything but an intrusion.

But as one video shows, some surprise party crashers can make the whole event even wilder.

As soon as the video starts, it's clear this pair have already started a wild ride.

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This scene comes from the Sea of Cortez, which is in the Gulf of California. Despite the name, the gulf actually separates Mexico's Baja Peninsula from the country's mainland.

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And it doesn't take long to figure out why the group chose this particular spot to go wakeboarding.

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The sea was teeming with dolphins, but it wasn't like they were just there to make the scenery prettier.

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If your eye starts to wander into the background, it won't take long before you notice something.

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The dolphins started appearing behind the boat. After all, it's hard not to get a little curious when something comes rumbling through your swimming spot.

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Sure enough, it doesn't take long for the dolphins to get so close that even the wakeboarding woman can see them next to her.

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If anything can turn your focus away from just concentrating on staying on the board, it's a dolphin popping up and saying hello.

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And that's especially true when it brings as many of its friends as the ones in this video did.

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Yeah, it's definitely clear that there were a lot of dolphins out that day. They obviously weren't shy, either.

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And as if this wasn't a perfect enough moment already, the dolphins started jumping.

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Considering the woman never loses her footing once with dolphins literally jumping right next to her, this probably wasn't her first time doing something like this.

This one will be a tough act to follow, though.

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As for the man in the boat, he was clearly glad they were filming the whole experience.

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At one point, he said, "We're gonna make a YouTube sensation," and he turned out to be right. At the moment, the video has over 21 million views.

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All in all, it was definitely a sight that most of us don't see every day.

And you can witness every majestic flap and leap for yourself in the full video. What trips you book after that are your own business.

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Dolphins seem to surf for the same reason as humans do, and the video above isn’t the first instance of a collaborative surf.

Whether you’re wakeboarding, surfing, or anything in between, dolphins love to swim side by side and enjoy the waves no matter where they take them.

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However, it isn’t always fun and games, when humans and dolphins interact. These mammals are known for sensing danger — and lending a helping fin.

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When Todd Endris was attacked by a great white shark while surfing, and suffered a 40-inch bite to the torse, a pod of dolphins surrounded him for protection until he reach the shore.

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Dave Rastovich, another surfer, was saved by a dolphin during an impending shark attack, too.

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“All of a sudden I saw a dolphin next to me that was behaving unusually hectic. From the top I saw how the dolphin came flying and hit a shark hard in the side,” he told Cooler Lifestyle

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The phenomenon of dolphin surfing isn’t uncommon at all, though.

On their own time, dolphins love to ride the barrel — and they’ve been doing this since at least the time of the Ancient Greeks.

Researchers from the University of Cambridge say the dolphins surf jut for the fun of it, “They are deeply intelligent creatures, so why not just have some fun and hang out?”

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Other theories suggest that dolphins surf as part of a mating ritual.

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By catching a rushing wave, these mammals can choose a mate that is strong, agile, and able to reach the prey beyond the barrel.

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A dolphin’s surf has a lot more to it than just the waves, though.

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During the swell, they make splashing noises to communicate with other nearby dolphins and strengthen social bonds, and coordinate their movements as a group — sort of like a dolphin dance troupe.

As both intelligent and playful mammals, dolphins and humans seem to have a lot in common — including dancin' around for fun.

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