Back in October 2013, National Geographic published a story that tackled the changing landscape of America — not its physical landscape made up of mountains, rivers, and roadways, but rather its racial and cultural appearance. For some, it's a concept that is difficult to understand and accept, but for others, it's something that's being welcomed with open arms. 

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There's no denying that interracial relationships are on the rise, which means children are coming into the world and identifying themselves as more than strictly black, white, brown, yellow, or red — categories that were created by German scientist Johann Friedrich Blumenbach back in the 18th century. 

Martin Schoeller | National Geographic

Now, we have identities like "Blackanese," "Juskimo," and "Filatino," and those are just a few examples of the direction we are heading — something National Geographic wanted to shine a light on and celebrate. 

Martin Schoeller | National Geographic
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So, Lise Funderburg and photographer Martin Schoeller worked together to create a piece for the magazine that showcased what the "average American" would look like by the year 2050.

Martin Schoeller | National Geographic

Not only did they study data collected by various institutions, like the U.S. Census Bureau, but they also spoke to various people about their identities and how they approach the subject of race in their everyday lives. 

Martin Schoeller | National Geographic